The First Real Female President…

In all actually, the first Female President of the United States was Edith Wilson, wife of President Woodrow Wilson…

As many historians will affirm, the real first woman president was the second Mrs. Wilson after her husband’s stroke in 1919. After his return from the Paris Peace Conference, the president went into seclusion and was only seen by very few people within the White House staff. Even Wilson’s most trusted advisors and cabinet members were never granted meetings with the ailing president.

Edith Wilson
Edith Wilson

Due to his infirmary, the First Lady actually took over his duties – penning much of his legislature at his advice and it is rumored that she also signed some of the documents as he was too sick to hold the pen. Her reasoning for being her husband’s surrogate was she wanted to make sure his initiatives saw their completion and didn’t trust many in upper levels of our government to carry out her husband’s wishes. Therefore, she banned all from being in his presence and set to work to fulfill his vision for the Wilson Legacy.

From 1919 to 1921 when he left office, First Lady Wilson oversaw all aspects of the government, including some diplomatic discussions with other heads of state throughout the world. She managed to pass impressive legislation that would more than garner her the title of acting president.

First Lady Nancy Reagan is shown during an interview with The Associated Press in the private quarters of the White House on Thursday, Dec. 17, 1987. Mrs. Reagan, looked back at the troubles of 1987 and said, "It's not been a great year. It's been the lowest I think you can get." (AP Photo/Barry Thumma)
First Lady Nancy Reagan is shown during an interview with The Associated Press Thursday, Dec. 17, 1987. (AP Photo/Barry Thumma)

Furthermore, many First Ladies were instrumental in their husbands’ presidencies. For example, Eleanor Roosevelt was instrument in some segments of the New Deal – like the planned communities such as Greenbelt, Maryland. She oversaw much of the building process and also spoke on behalf of the projects before many diplomats and congressional members. She lobbied and found donors while working towards a fix to the Great Depressions’ ills for most Americans during the 1930s leading up to the Second World War. Furthermore, it was Eleanor not FDR that was interested in Civil Rights for the Black Communities throughout the country, but due to the unpopularity among Democrats, she was asked to cease her initiative by the President.

Other First Ladies also took their office very seriously as they created and forwarded pet projects. Nancy Reagan’s Just Say No Drug campaign was a well-known staple of the 1980s. It was a project she was adamantly passionate about and did much of the lobbying for the initiative without her husband, Ronald Reagan to influence much of her initiatives.

Rose_Carter,_official_color_photo,_1977-cropped
Rosalynn Carter – Official Portrait from 1977

Many historians versed in political and US Foreign Affairs History can attest that Rosalynn Carter was also an integral part of Jimmy Carter’s Camp David Accords where he brokered peace between Israel and Egypt, hosting the conference between Anwar El Sadat and Menachem Begin. It is further said he often consulted her for her opinions on governance as well.

Being that much of Common Core is saturated in revised history and nonsense, these little tidbits of history are almost lost from public knowledge. Hence, while Hillary Clinton likes to tell her adoring ‘fans’ about how she would be the first female president, she is sorely mistaken and grossly misleading people much like she did when she forgot Victoria Woodhull was the first female to run on a ticket in a presidential race.

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